The last few months have been a battle of survival at many levels. In the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, we saw organizations scrambling to respond rapidly to lockdowns, ensuring the safety of their employees, customers, external stakeholders and balance sheets. Companies hunkered down for what many believed would be several weeks of work from home and short term lockdown measures.

Nearly six months later, we are still learning to navigate the constantly changing immediate and short term challenges, day-by-day and week-by-week. We see daily examples of companies rapidly innovating to remain relevant and survive. Retailers and restaurants are doubling down on curbside pickup and parking lot seating on picnic benches. Manufacturers are quickly retooling to produce personal protective equipment for frontline workers who need it most. Healthcare organizations are accelerating their development of telemedicine platforms to deliver high quality patient care from a distance. Every day work teams are finding new ways to stay connected, collaborate and engage.

Yet history shows that only a small percentage of companies emerge stronger through crises. The key to success is to make short term responsive changes and use the disruptive period to make bold changes that position the company for long term growth. For CEOs and their leadership teams, it comes down to choices.  How do we handle both near and longer term needs? What do we focus on? How do we prioritize? How do we transform and emerge from this crisis stronger than before?

To help organizations navigate these choices, we’ve put together Emerging Stronger, a guide for CEOs and executive teams to plan the changes needed to preserve, maintain, and strengthen the health of their organizations as we navigate our ever-changing world. You’ll see that while the transformation playbook looks similar to that of other crisis recovery periods, winning in the next normal requires a drastically different game plan.

Click below to read our full guide.

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